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Friday, March 28th 2014

1:07 PM

May be a second look at a 1997 National Geographic van Gogh article by Joel L. Swerdlow


Article is from The National Geographic Vol 192, NO. 4  October 1997 pg. 100 - 131




In the last picture of this article as stated below, this would be the first look from any of us at these hymnal drawings drawn by Vincent van Gogh.



As we can read what is stated by Annet Tellegen, one of the leading scholars on Vincent van Gogh, who had one hell of a lot to do with getting rid of many of his original works of art by her non-ability to be able to see his true style and techniques that was used by him in his works of art.




Not much more good could be said about the Curator of prints and drawings who is at this time in charge of everything that goes on in this foundation.  One experts who knows him say he arrived there by family name while Sjaar van Heugten the Curator states that they were drawn in a church hymnal in 1881.



As we examine these drawing in this hymnal, we are able to see the two brother in the upper half of this drawing. Vincent and Theo look to be singing from this shared hymnal. Theo, Johanna and Vincent all in church possibly with little baby Vincent.  Below facing the other way we can see Jo in her Sunday bonnet. This drawing I'd say was drawn in May of 1890 after Vincent going back to Paris for a planned two week visit with Theo, Jo and little baby Vincent. On that Sunday morning after going outside to smoke his pipe Vincent had just up and disappeared with out saying a word.



    

 I wouldn't want to suggest all that was on Vincent's mind in looking at these little supposed clumsy and nonchalant scribbles that Annet had mentioned was just smoking his pipe. He had a lot on his mind at that time, but not wanting to cause any animosities he decided right then that he would take that long twenty some miles walk back to where he had just come from on the train.  It seems to me that Vincent was really troubled in his thoughts of what could have happened to his paintings and art work that he found were missing, after going around the night before with Theo to the three places at which they were all stored at. That was one of the main reasons besides the visit, was for Vincent to re-visit some of his earlier works to get some good Ideas for making other painting in his now know style he was using.  You can read there letters from this time period and get a real good idea what really might possibly went down. For Vincent acting this way for the reasons just mentioned and Vincent just walking away, his brother Theo was thinking seriously of calling it quits with his brother Vincent. You can read that scenario in their letters if you care to.


      
If you want to see Vincent smoking his pipe as Vincent did and also myself,...  just look at Jo's face like it is Vincent's pipe bowl while the bonnet she is warring makes up part of Vincent's own face around the mouth and nose area.  Most art experts of the V.vG. Foundation would say that Vincent did not draw or paint in this way. Well now, as some can now see, just maybe we can come to the same conclusions. Do you possibly think the computer that created this Gold Commemorate Coin for his 150th Birthday just may be able to weed out a few of the fakes while bringing quite a few more works created by his hand out for public viewing?  I'm mainly talking about most these works Vincent had done that some how has managed to survive all these years.  Ones that were sold and even given away by all his disgruntled ex-landlords, restaurant owners, cobblers & gobblers, prostitutes & whores, not to mention most all his family,... even including his art dealing brother Theo.  He had kept mostly only the ones he thought were promising and not unsellable. 

The talk going around the art world about these very questionable works of Vincent's were that they all pretty much were lost or destroyed in the past. A lot of them the experts say were used to cover cracks in the out-houses to keep the chill off. We all know and can perceive as we all have been told, that the main thing about this artist works, in order for them to be considered authentic is like this main chief cook and bottle washer says,.. "Provenance, or history of ownership, is crucial when judging whether a work is genuine." Now that is one hell of a statement coming from this almost like Roman Emperor, when it come to the letting the people of the arts know what is needed to be authentic. I would only guess the total ruination of the art world is at hand if something isn't drastically changed damn soon.



       

A nineteenth and seventeenth century paintings.

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Thursday, February 27th 2014

9:51 AM

German Artist Paul Geissler 1881- 1965


Maria della Salute, Venice
Paul Geissler (1881-1965)
Etching
363 x 282 mm

In 1630 a plague epidemic entered Venice, killing a third of the population. The Venetian Senate decreed, in hope that the plague should abate, that a new church should be built and dedicated to the Santa Maria della Salute (Saint Mary of Health). In 1631 the plague was defeated, and construction began under the direction of 33-year-old architect Baldassarre Longhena.




Paul Geissler

Paul Geissler was born in 1881 and died in 1965. He was one of the foremost German etchers. His plates, chiefly of the architectural beauties of old Europe, have been highly praised by many of the most discriminating critics and collectors. Yet his work appeals as strongly to the public as it does to connoisseurs.

Every one of whom the famous ruins of Italy or the beauties of the German and Belgian Cathedrals hold fascination; all those for whom the past glories of the Old World exercise a romantic spell will appreciate the charm of Geissle’s etchings.

Through Geissler’s work one can renew acquaintance with well-remembered scenes or see, perfectly presented, the most beautiful of Europe’s famous old buildings.
From 1919 on Paul Geissler lived in Garmisch-Partenkirchen.
























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Thursday, February 20th 2014

9:27 AM

Gustav Klimt "Danae", "The Kiss", "Adelene"




Austrian artist Klimt (1862 – 191 was known to have an exceeding love for two things: his home country and women. In art circles, he was known as a womanizer (fathering at least 14 illegitimate children), and it was this extreme admiration of women that motivated both his philandering and his artwork. He said, "Whoever wants to know something about me, as an artist, which alone is significant, they should look attentively at my pictures and there seek to recognize what I am and what I want.




















These above two oil painting are from my collection. They are copies of Klimt's works on canvas and was painted by an artist who is now deceased and was a retired FBI agent who lived in Boise.

Rembrandt's "Danae"  below





Trust me
vanrijngo 
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Saturday, December 21st 2013

3:26 PM

Western Art by known artists



Joe Beeler (1931-2006) - Fording the River
Oil on Canvas

24 " x 36 "

PDC92431-0610-196

$13,350

This painting can be purchased at the address below.

http://www.medicinemangallery.com/collection/deceased,-other/c/Beeler,-Joe-%281931%252D2006%29/1/Joe-Beeler-%281931%252D2006%29-%252D-Fording-the-River


Now this is what I'm talking about.  Everyone looks at this Joe Beeler painting here and says to themselves, what a masterful work of art to hang in someones living room.  Well my art loving friends,... not me or my living room. Maybe he is considered a fair painter, but I say, not a real cowboy, or at least not very knowledgeable about what and how cowboys handled things when moving cows around. He calls this painting "Fording the River" when two or three cows is all that can cross at one time.  Hell, here in the city of Caldwell, Idaho we have Indian Creek that runs through the middle of the city bigger that that so-called river. What is that cowboy looking for, a place he can relieve himself or to check out his horses balance in that terrain?

I sent this off two days ago these pictures asking for their free evaluation.

Signed CMR +AWS and a Buffalo Skull drawing (Auction Evaluation Art: Fine Art: Western ID 28920414) (Thread:948238 

Thank you for your inquiry to xxxxx Auction.  Your art work is a copy of a work by Charles Marion Russell, probably by an amateur artist.  The art work would have minimal value at auction.

Mxxx  xxxx, Fine Art


 Well, first of all, I have never seen this painting of Charlies for this so-called amateur artist to copy it from, unless she was talking about parts of paintings of different ones of his.  That would take to much brain work from most who copy others works of art, for they would want it all laid out there before them to copy exactly as they would think the artist would paint it.

Myself would say that ain't the case of this work of art.  The artist of this work of art used to many of Russell's own techniques and included to many of his not known idiosyncrasies of his own hand and brush strokes for me to see.  Other wise, I would not have bought this painting in the first place.  I'm not saying I'm infallible, but if not a Russell, better than a amateur and more than minimal value.


I love the way the artist has this trail boss, could be his name of these initials used in the signature, how he has him positioned in his saddle, while you can almost hear him thinking of where they might hold up for the evening camp site for his cattle hands and the herd. Check out that horses stance to counter balance the weight on his back.  Only a good cowboy would know to paint the way his other foot is in his stirrup and his ass slid over to possibly get the charlie horse out of his leg from climbing that higher hill to contemplate these things.  This painting does speak abundance of these thing to its viewers. Can you imagine seeing Indian Creek down there to where these animals were possibly able to fill their bellies with that ever need water they needed for this trip to the market place?




Isn't kind of ironic that this signature of his is looking a little like it could possibly be a false signature?  Do you really think a dishonest copier would have went back to the paint pallet to reload his brush for that other leg of the R in his initials to darken it down?  +AWS could also stand for Artist West Sale, possible who Nancy had him paint it for, or possibly Auction Western Sale,... who knows for sure or who really cares.  More that likely when it sold it didn't bring much to be noted for to begin with for who ever the high bidder was.  These are the main reasons works of art escape these so-called experts abilities of knowing for sure. I'll include a few pics of the back of the art work that I didn't send for the evaluation.



The back of the 'Cattle Drive".



Showing one of the corners of  the 'Cattle Drive".



 
Above is one of the back pics of "Cattle Drive" painting.



In this picture above you can see one of the Indian camps of his blood-brother and close friend Chief Black-Eagle of the Black-feet Indians. Russel is said to have lived with them one year, but as close as they were I say it was on and off and maybe some time over what they believe. I Know that Russell had a child with his blood-brother wife. It is an old Indian tradition that when you become a blood-brother of an Indian what is his is also yours and vice-verso.



Here in this picture of the back you can just barely make out the initials of CMR.



This happens to show where he had signed it in the back and it looks like he had used a knife or some kind of a sharp object to do this.





You wanna see Russell's Buffalo,... or is that the devil?


A nude sculpture of Charlie sleeping in the nude sculpted out of clay. You can see the different colors he had added when he had painted it that has pretty much dissipated over time.  Some idiot looks like they though they seem some initials and a date underneath on it edge and got out their little grinder with a circular saw blade to enhance what they thought they seen.  Came pretty close  only leaving out one initial, but judging from the looks of it I guess his age to be about 35 to 45.  So,.. you add 35 years to 1864 his birth date and the date would be between 1899 & 1909 somewhere in that time period I'd say this sculpture of him Russell done. 



More on Charlie Russell's Pictures and more stories. Click link below to see.

http://s95.photobucket.com/user/vanrijngo/story/12655#







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Thursday, December 12th 2013

10:19 AM

Horror and shame: The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is authorizing this junk.



Van Gogh Museum director Axel Ruger, left, shows a copy of "Wheatfield under Thunderclouds" to reporters in Taipei, Taiwan. (Mandy Cheng / October 30, 2013)


Coming soon to an art fair near you: 3-D reproductions of Vincent Van Gogh paintings.


Introductory price: $35,000 a pop (limited time only).

Horror and shame: The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is authorizing this junk.


Through the transom Thursday came a news release from a Hollywood public relations firm trumpeting the imminent U.S. launch of -- wait for it -- “Reliefographs,” which are claimed to capture all the textured, painterly bravura of a real Van Gogh masterpiece. Five works from the museum's collection form the initial batch of copies.

“Van Gogh often used thick applications of paint on his canvas,” says Van Gogh Museum director Axel Rüger, just before coughing up what may be the most remarkable line I've seen by someone in a similarly exalted professional position: “These high-quality limited editions allow people [to] acquire their own Van Gogh masterpiece.”

ART: Can you guess the high price?

They do? I thought they allowed someone to buy an expensive, lumpy copy of a masterpiece.

These things will be unveiled in the United States in January when the L.A. Art Show opens at the Convention Center. They've already been flogged at an October display in a Taiwan shopping mall -- a venue that recalls the uptown Manhattan store the late Nelson Rockefeller once opened to sell overpriced knockoffs of his Modern art collection. The Rockefeller gambit flopped.

The artificial-Van Gogh offer follows fast on the heels of “The Complete Frida Kahlo: Her Paintings, Her Life, Her Story,” a pseudo-exhibition of 123 replicas of the Mexican painter's work now at the former San Diego Naval Training Center (tickets: $16.50 for credulous adults). “Completely dishonest” is how San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art director Hugh Davies succinctly described that event to local media.

What's amazing about the Van Gogh Reliefographs -- and try keeping a straight face when you say it -- is that, for $35,000, one could buy a genuine work of art, rather than some glorified photograph of a work of art. (Fujifilm Belgium developed the reproduction process, which is no doubt trademarked in all the right places.) And an art museum is apparently happy to sell out its important mission for a cut of the profits.

I wonder: We know that one of Vincent's last paintings showed a flock of black crows, but did he ever paint a swarm of pigeons?

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/culture/la-et-cm-van-gogh-reliefographs-20131205,0,117089.story#ixzz2nHWPfpq2

vanringo says;

 This I believe is the beginning of the end for the Vincent van Gogh museum's high volume of traffic, and the rest of the other museums will follow. People now will not be able to tell the difference between the real Mac coy and the fakes. It will be just like the fakes that are already in our museums now. The ones who are supposed to be the art experts running these museums and artists foundations right now cannot tell the difference.  I say when the museums allow these things to go on in the public eye, while even participating basically just for the revenue, in my eyes and I believe in many other art lovers eyes, that most will come to the conclusion that art ran by these so-called experts now in charge is at this present time is pretty much crapola!


 Now people can see that everyone can own a van Gogh painting of their choice, hanging right in their own living rooms. Just think,.... without having to put one foot into their museum to see the others fakes, since they are so damn easy to produce. All for the price of a messily $35,000 dollars you can be just like the Vincent van Gogh Foundation.  This new technology, I'd say has been around for a while, and if the are convinced that it hasn't been, these techniques will soon be discovered by a lot more knock-off company's to compete in lower prices for many others who can have the same things hanging in their own houses, only way cheaper. To heck with these museums and their high priced paintings which is now said by art expert police in France to be about fifty percent fakes already!


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Thursday, November 14th 2013

10:01 AM

Rembrandt's "Three Trees", & the first "Nude Portrait of Saskia"

A very important painting by Rembrandt.
"Saskia nude under the three trees"




This I believe was Saskia's very first encounter she had with the artist who is responsible for this masterful work of art. It was Rembrandt himself who said you did not have to go to Italy to paint an Italian sunset or landscape. Now in comparing this nude portrait of this lovely young maiden to others of his works of art we'll see the exact same thing. Whether or not it was the same model or not. In these cut-out of the woman below of known and others not known to Rembrandt's work we can visualize his own way of painting in these masterpieces.



As you should see by comparing these nude cut-outs you can see the similarities is style and techniques being used. He was a master of deception while using his lights and shadows called chiaroscuro.

 


Two portraits above of Saskia van Uylenburgh




I hate to haft to tell ones hard of seeing to look for Rembrandt's self-portrait in the middle of the green of all three tree and then to look at the nude bodies in the trunks of the trees.



I would venture to say that this above her head that she is looking at is only one of the reasons she is shown slapping with that twig in her hand the back-side of the artist and saying at the same time,... "You nasty nasty man you!"



Enhanced Saskia's nude portrait

A computer would read in the feet area Rhl Rembrandt van Rijn Saskia Von Ulenbourch. This painting although is signed as about as ugly as it can get,... Rolland. Please don't hit me so easy with that twig Gal,... wake me up I'm coming back to life.
- See more at: http://s95.photobucket.com/user/vanrijngo/media/1Dreammypaintingthenpaintthem/Saskia%20under%20RHLs%20Three%20Trees/nuda2.jpg.html?sort=6&o=20#sthash.bcGA4132.dpuf
This painting signatures looks to have been played with as far as signatures goes, but the style and techniques does lead me to believe possibly who the actual artist happens to be.
A computer would read in the feet area Rhl Rembrandt van Rijn Saskia Von Ulenbourch. This painting although is signed as about as ugly as it can get,... Rolland. Please don't hit me so easy with that twig Gal,... wake me up I'm coming back to life - See more at: http://s95.photobucket.com/user/vanrijngo/media/1Dreammypaintingthenpaintthem/Saskia%20under%20RHLs%20Three%20Trees/nuda2.jpg.html?sort=6&o=20#sthash.bcGA4132.dpuf

Enhanced Saskia's nude portrait

A computer would read in the feet area Rhl Rembrandt van Rijn Saskia Von Ulenbourch. This painting although is signed as about as ugly as it can get,... Rolland. Please don't hit me so easy with that twig Gal,... wake me up I'm coming back to life.
- See more at: http://s95.photobucket.com/user/vanrijngo/media/1Dreammypaintingthenpaintthem/Saskia%20under%20RHLs%20Three%20Trees/nuda2.jpg.html?sort=6&o=20#sthash.bcGA4132.dpuf



What a hell of a signature done here in red.  I don't really believe it representing the rightful artist such as the artist Rembrandt, the artist who I believed painted this painting of his wife Saskia before they were married.



Painting had been relined some time back. It also came out of an important estate from California and it was said as they were selling it on eBay that they thought it was a very important painting in our history. - See more at: http://s95.photobucket.com/user/vanrijngo/media/1Dreammypaintingthenpaintthem/Saskia%20under%20RHLs%20Three%20Trees/MVC-008F.jpg.html?sort=6&o=23#sthash.bcGA4132.dpuf
Back of the oil painting of "Saskia Nude" under the three trees.

The painting has been relined some time back and had came from an important estate from California that was sold on eBay while saying it was thought to be a very important history painting.




































vanrijngo

Back of Saskia Nude

Painting had been relined some time back. It also came out of an important estate from California and it was said as they were selling it on eBay that they thought it was a very important painting in our history.
- See more at: http://s95.photobucket.com/user/vanrijngo/media/1Dreammypaintingthenpaintthem/Saskia%20under%20RHLs%20Three%20Trees/MVC-008F.jpg.html?sort=6&o=23#sthash.AJMEc8mM.dpuf


Back of Saskia Nude

Painting had been relined some time back. It also came out of an important estate from California and it was said as they were selling it on eBay that they thought it was a very important painting in our history.
- See more at: http://s95.photobucket.com/user/vanrijngo/media/1Dreammypaintingthenpaintthem/Saskia%20under%20RHLs%20Three%20Trees/MVC-008F.jpg.html?sort=6&o=23#sthash.AJMEc8mM.dpuf
A computer would read in the feet area Rhl Rembrandt van Rijn Saskia Von Ulenbourch. This painting although is signed as about as ugly as it can get,... Rolland. Please don't hit me so easy with that twig Gal,... wake me up I'm coming back to life - See more at: http://s95.photobucket.com/user/vanrijngo/media/1Dreammypaintingthenpaintthem/Saskia%20under%20RHLs%20Three%20Trees/nuda2.jpg.html?sort=6&o=20#sthash.bcGA4132.dpuf
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Sunday, September 1st 2013

9:43 AM

1888 Sunflowers

Vincent van Gogh's Sunflowers,

... "1888 Sunflowers"

TheirMunichSunFlowers.jpg

Theirs

c366.jpg MVC-009Scol

Theirs

5bfb.jpg My sunfl1a

Mine

Who actually do you think created this painting & coin?  A copier of Vincent's sunflowers who thought he or she knew how to paint, and three or four Dutchman getting together to place all of the letters into this coin in the proper places to show a perfect face of Vincent?  Or,.... do you possibly think a computer had something to do with some being able to see what is unveiled in these techniques and images already in his works of art?  In the future this will be the finger print of Vincent van Gogh in all of his true works of art.   Naturally there will be fact similes of these techniques in copies of his works, but nothing like the print the computer will read of Vincent's own hand,.... believe me.  This coin impression would have come from what the computer already reads in Vincent's works of art as some will be able to see as we move along. 

More the exact colors in mine

the exact colors in mine

Above is truer in color to what your eyes will see while in front of this painting.  Only a true artist can tell for sure how this work was truly created.  In standing in front of these sunflowers and in looking at how the paint was applied one does not need to imagine the length of time that it took the artist to create and complete this painting.  It totally blows ones mind in seeing the paint application, the use of color, the total control of the artist's hand as the brush is applying the heavy imposto and moving quickly to all areas of the painting as to finish this painting in a 4 to 5 hour sitting.  You see with your own eyes absolutely no overlaying of paint, only in certain prescribe areas known only to the artist to achieve the artist's right effects.  It is not hard to imagine a expert of Vincent van Gogh's "Sunflowers" making this statement.  MFA expert: "It is stupid. He is one of the most copied artists. But it is not easy at all. Your copy of the Sunflowers is apparently the first good copy that I have ever seen.  I want to see a good enlargement for confirmation". Our short time collaboration suddenly stop dead in its tracks when I slipped and told his that all communications with me were to be open to the art public eventually later on down the road, like inVicent van Gogh's letters.

Now, this is a signature that most would consider to be a forged signature if not done by the artist in question,.. wouldn't you agree?   Maybe some would think that possibly this signature was the makers name of the "pot" holding the sunflowers?  Well,.. of course it is, and the maker of the whole painting.

100_1068.jpg

Who actually do you think created this painting & coin?  A copier of Vincent's sunflowers who thought he or she knew how to paint, and three or four Dutchman getting together to place all of the letters into this coin in the proper places to show a perfect face of Vincent?  Or,.... do you possibly think a computer had something to do with some being able to see what is unveiled in these techniques and images already in his works of art?  In the future this will be the finger print of Vincent van Gogh in all of his true works of art.   Naturally there will be fact similes of these techniques in copies of his works, but nothing like the print the computer will read of Vincent's own hand,.... believe me.  This coin impression would have come from what the computer already reads in Vincent's works of art as some will be able to see as we move along. 

 

  

Rembrandt yelling into what is left of Vincent's ear,....  "You stupid idiot!  What did you do that for!?"

Arles, 30 April 1889
  My dear Theo,
-------------------------------------------":Today I am busy packing a case
of pictures and studies. One of them is flaking off and I have stuck some
newspaper on it; it is one of the best, and I think that when you look at it
you will see better what my now shipwrecked studio might have been. This
painting, like some others, has got spoiled by moisture during my illness.
the flood water came to within a few feet of the house, and on top of that,
the house itself had no fires in it during my absence, so when I came back,
the walls were oozing water and
saltpeter."------------------------------------

  

My dear Bernard,

' I want to do figures, figures and more figures. I cannot resist that series of bipeds from the baby to Socrates, and from the woman with black hair and white skin to the woman with yellow hair and a sunburned brick-red face,... the meantime I am mostly doing other things.  I wanted to send you a very large and very careful drawing. Very well! It turned out quite different, though it is correct.  For this time again the color suggest a blazing air of harvest time in the South, in the middle of the dog days, and without that it's another picture.

  I dare believe that Gauguin and you would understand it; but how ugly people will think it! You know what a peasant is, how strongly he reminds one of a wild beast, when you have found one of the true race.   Oh! that beautiful midsummer sun here.  It beats down on one's head, and I haven't the slightest doubt that it makes one crazy.  But as I was so to begin with, I only enjoy it.

  I am thinking of decorating my studio with half a dozen pictures of “Sunflowers,” a decoration in which the raw or broken chrome yellows will blaze forth on various backgrounds - blue, from the palest malachite green to royal blue, framed in thin strips of wood painted with orange lead. Effects like those of stained-glass windows in a Gothic church.

  Ah! my dear comrades, let us crazy ones take delight in our eyesight in spite of everything, yes, let's!  Alas, nature takes it out of the animal, and our bodies are despicable and sometimes a heavy burden. But it has been like that ever since Giotto, that man with his poor health.   Ah! and what a feast for the eyes all the same, and what a smile of the old lion Rembrandt, with a piece of white cloth around his head, his palette in his hand!

  How much I would like to spend these days in Pont-Aven; however, I find comfort in contemplating the sunflowers.  A hearty handshake, till soon again.

Sincerely yours, Vincent

________________________________

   526 [about 21 August 88]

My dear Theo,

' I write in great haste to tell you that I have had a note from Gauguin, saying that he has not written much, but that he is quite ready to come South as soon as the opportunity arises.  They are enjoying themselves very much painting, arguing and fighting with the worthy Englishmen; he speaks well of Bernard's work, and B. speaks well of Gauguin's.  I am hard at it, painting with the enthusiasm of a Marseillais eating bouillabaisse, which won't surprise you when you know that what I'm at is the painting of some big sunflowers.'

I have three canvases going - 1st, three huge flowers in a green vase, with a light background, a size 15 canvas;  [F453] 2nd, three flowers, one gone to seed, having lost its petals, and one bud against a royal-blue background, size 25 canvas; [F 459] 3rd, twelve flowers in a yellow vase (size 30 canvas).  The last one is therefore light on light, and I hope it will be the best. Probably I shall not stop at that.

   Now that I hope to live with Gauguin in a studio of our own, I want to make decorations for the studio. Nothing but big flowers. Next door to your shop, in the restaurant, you know there is a lovely decoration of flowers; I always remember the big sunflowers in the window there. If I carry out this idea there will be a dozen panels. So the whole thing will be a symphony in blue and yellow. I am working at it every morning from sunrise on, for the flowers fade so soon, and the thing is to do the whole in one rush...'

  'I have heaps of ideas for new canvases...'

   ' Only I am beginning more and more to try a simple technique which is perhaps not impressionistic.  I would like to paint in such a way that everybody, at least if they have eyes, would see it...'

In evaluating these Sunflower as Vincent had eluded to himself,  let's just imagine that most will be able to finally see what exactly he was saying.  I might suggest before we get started that the true men remain seated and the women don't matter, but may need to arrange for a panty guard, just in case.  This premise should help us all get started with the true definition of this painting.  First let's start at the bottom of this painting, and as we see in the yellow pot separated by the white paint possibly two sets or should I say pairs of legs.  Are you all with me?  As we might be able to surmise they could be facing each other.  Please don't leave,..stay with me if you would like to know the truth about this painting that he was referring to.  Now that we all understand what was now said, let's continue.

In looking at the left whole side of this painting let us imagine like Einstein,... letting our imagination run away with itself and imagine the top left sunflower being a young ladies head while the green Sunflower below it is a woolly sweater.  Are you getting the picture?  Wow! the two middle Sunflower at the top combined together could be a head leaning backwards while the mouth is open like a birds beak wanting a worm.  Wow!....Somebody I believe is getting the big  worm.

 

I'm sure what I see and what a computer sees is considerably different than what 99 % of what U C.

This painting I believe was locked up in the yellow house in Arles France after Vincent had cut off his ear on December 23rd until he got out of the hospital in March of 1889. This painting, according to my studies is one of the same that Vincent wrote about in these letters that he wrote on March 24th, and April 30th, 1889 to his brother Theo:

My Dear Theo, " I am writing to tell you that I have seen Signac, and It has done me quite a lot of good. he was so good and straightforward and simply when the difficulty of opening the door by force or not presented itself---the police had closed up the house and destroyed the lock. They began by refusing to let us do it, but all the same we finally got in.---------------------------------------Doubtless you had a Hand   in his coming to stiffen my morale a bit, and thank you for it.---------------Altogether there are several canvases to be sent to you, as Signac could see, he was not frightened by my painting as far as I saw. Signac thought,and it is perfectly true, that I looked healthy.---------- In my opinion we must firmly oppose  the loss of furniture, etc... Then-----my Lord-------I must have liberty to carry on my handicraft.

 M. Rey says that instead of eating enough and at regular times, I kept myself going on coffee and alcohol. I admit all that, but all the same it is true that to attain the high yellow note that I attained last summer, I really had to be pretty well keyed up.--------------------------------Oh if nothing had happened to mess up my life!"

Arles,30 April 1889

 My dear Theo, -------------------------------------------":Today I am busy packing a case of pictures and studies. One of them is flaking off and I have stuck some newspaper on it; it is one of the best, and I think that when you look at it you will see better what my now shipwrecked studio might have been. This painting, like some others, has got spoiled by moisture during my illness. the flood water came to within a few feet of the house, and on top of that, the house itself had no fires in it during my absence, so when I came back, the walls were oozing water and saltpeter."------------------------------------

 

 

"A Study of Sunflowers"

writings and studies by;    Bob Miller---vanrijngo---art-zee

All the writings in this article are of my own views and studies of Vincent van Gogh's documented writing from his letters and van Gogh book contexts. 

I have always been under the impression that tiles and accomplished achievement are something well earned and not just handed you on a piece of paper.  Well,... I say that it is time to bring out the truths instead of making every effort in covering up truths and using power instead of knowledge keeping things as they are, by suppressing truths by so-called family member so-called MFA experts at artists Foundations.

With new scientific research and new technologies in this world and how quickly they are advancing and how exact they are, I say it is now time to get science involved along with the computers to tell the truths as to who artists actually were, copyist or the actual artists in question..  These technical advancement of science could be done by many responsible people and students learning new computer and scanning technologies in colleges and universities from around this world.

   Asked yourself, why is it so important for some to keep things as they are?  Do new art buyers and investors really want to take all these provenance's and hands on expertise determinations as the gospel, as the Japanese and other buyers have in the past?   Or would you rather have scientific proof? As far as provenance's go, they prove nothing other than the possibilities of forgery, fooling the supposed MFA experts in charge of artists Foundations.

I say let the ones in the scientific field work along with the art field, make the determinations together instead of only the ones not being able to find out anything for sure and saying and making outrageous determinations to protect their own well being.  Does this sound reasonable to you?

I cannot understand how the governments of the worlds can remain silent themselves, leaving the general public and art investors believing everything is in the responsible one's hands.  What would you believe Picasso meant when he said; "Museums are full of lies and people who make art their business are mostly Impostor's"?  Well ,... It is not hard for me to figure out, and shouldn't be for you either.

As I see, the same as Rembrandt and Vincent van Gogh did, Vincent's trees should become understandable when Vincent himself alluded to his sunflower pictures as to symbolizing "gratitude".   Referring to the intensity with which he painted, and precisely in connection with the masterfully constructed paintings of the sunflowers, he says that, face to face with nature, he is seized with such excitement as to fall into fainting spells. ( I contend he also meant the excitement that most women feel in looking at the sunflowers and are reluctant to talk about).  This excitement, he explains, is of the same kind as that experienced by people when they are overcome with gratitude.  What exactly did he mean by this?  I would say myself it is kinda like that feeling one gets in that one or two times in most life times when that long and drawn out feeling of getting ready to explode into a climax seems to last forever.  Indeed, when one really thinks about his Sunflowers and studies them, one can grasp what he really meant.

_________________

One must also wonder what a recognized MFA expert of fake van Gogh's, which I won't mention his name, meant when he told me in an email,  "There is no expert at the VvG Foundation. Just two art historians in the Museum that became without any particular knowledge on Vincent (may be they knew his family name) became the best specialists in the world from one day to the other. The other scholars and the students are not better than them."

 

Don't most of you know as the same MFA had told me in another email, "A painting is not a piece produced by a genius.   Vincent was no genius, he was at work every day and had some ideas.  He succeeded.  Would another taste be on fashion today we would have another genius at   the top of the Pantheon.  But you are right and Vincent said that people were not buying paintings with artistic goals."

Bob:"Yes, here we are again with no work of his to really show for the way he was known to paint."


MFA expert: "I know some, that surfaced in 1938, but they were rejected."


Bob:  "And more than likely these were his true works of art if they happened to be examined scientifically, using photo enhancements for comparison of known techniques of Vincent's true works of art using five or six other ways and means that is rejected right now as art experts techniques and verifications."


MFA expert:  "Experts are more and more using new techniques."


Bob:  "It seem to me as though their main way of making their own decisions is by this soon to be out dated way which they rely so much on."


MFA expert:  " I don't think so, because their expertise are not depending on the works but on the market organization. If the market stays what it is, the automatic "no" will remain "the" rule."

Bob:  Most auction house employees, art experts or what ever you want to call them do not impress me what-so-ever with their knowledge.   Their interest are only in a few things as far as I am concerned. (1) First of all if painting or art work is signed. (2)Who is the owner.   (3) Wanting a stack of provenance telling them all about it.  (4) How much did you pay for it.  (5)  Where did you get it.  (6) What was said about it from its Foundation of the artist and do they except it from being from that artist. (7)   What would you be willing to take for it.  (   If we happen to take this on our action we might have to sell it in the circle of the artist and it more than likely won't bring its reserve we put on it, so are you prepared to pay the auction charges and the buy back fees?  (   As you are walking out,  ........  That is a fine painting,  .........  What  would you take for it or what do you want for that work?

MFA expert:  "Indeed! You seem to be used to dealing with these people."

I believe that  the use of computer DNA, which I call it, scanned styles of the artist brush strokes which are their real finger prints, and even if true finger prints could and are know to be found on the edges and the backs of art work, in the paint itself caused by paint from finger tips and palm prints of the artists while holding the art work will really make a great improvement in determining who painted what.  Just as in the controversy of a Picasso with a fingerprint the Picasso Foundations refuses to acknowledge.  Artist's styles and techniques known to be his or her style in different time periods of their lives could be determined by use of scanners. Paint and material still could be analyzed, while discounting the traces of resins which weren't supposedly around then which could seep into the paint from varnishes over the years would also be a good start. 

Bob:  a lot of things   that has been said by so-called MFA experts does not add up.  One of these day do you suppose there might be a computer that you could feed into it all of the massive information on these artists and others and be able to ask it some questions.

Right now it would probably tell  you that everything is too confusing from most being said.  Later on it might by itself start to weed out all of the myths and come up with some straight answers that will make a lot of experts run and hide.

MFA expert:  "The computer is under the control of the experts".

Bob: I will never understand why the experts say Vincent van Gogh is the most easily copied of all other artists.

MFA expert: "It is stupid. He is one of the most copied artists. But it is not easy at all. Your copy of the Sunflowers is apparently the first good copy that I have ever seen.  I want to see a good enlargement for confirmation".

Bob:  Yes, I would say many exceptions to their rules.  Most everything they say does not add up.  One of these day do you suppose there might be a computer that you could feed into it all of the massive information on this artist and be able to ask it some questions.  As far as I am concerned, most evidence that you speak of was manufactured by the experts before you, and is now excepted as the gospel truths which could not be further from the truths in most cases.

MFA expert: "I'm not a believer and do not rely on previous experts. I read what they said but do not remember the gospels. Some teams are working on the subject. On Vincent they put all the forgeries and their bases and the best of this research is that they used a fake pallet to get pigments. Anyhow, the computer will hardly be able to understand more than the man. The problem is not to calculate but to understand".

http://s95.photobucket.com/albums/l136/vanrijngo/?action=view¤t=Image1.gif

Above I made a cartoon drawing of Vincent van Gog painting for a friend of mine just to make him laugh. We were having coffee at the kitchen table on 11/11/99 before the work day began and I drew this drawing in about 3 or 4 minutes on a pink telephone call slip for his enjoyment, while the night before I was studying Rembrandt's drawing of "Satire Against Art Criticism." The drawing I made of this cartoon of Vincent, remarkably surprised myself when studying it later, to see and find what was in it, inspirations of that drawing by Rembrandt, which advanced itself into my own work of art by some supernatural means. A little freaky I would say.

 

" A Dilemma "
As I sit here watching my monitor
screen,
some things are considered to be to
obscene.
At  looking  at items  on  eBay's  auction
sight,
is tomorrow the day for an international
flight?
Do the buyers believe  what some.... try to
sell,
descriptions seem to come straight from
hell.
You say what, who painted that in the
past?
No wonder why some are being
harassed.
Rembrandt & Vincent go back in
time,
not understood what's on their
minds.
People in this world remain the
same,
everyone seem to be on that same old
train.
Art market, love boat, stock market,
Whatever,
knowing the consequences, no matter how
clever.
Should I go to Amsterdam and get lost in the
masses?
Or stay here, do what I do, only to be insulted by
asses.

Is that 36-26-38 ?    Sometimes,
Does not excellence begin by simply not quitting?

Poem by

 Bob Miller-vanrijngo copyrighted

_________________________________

 

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Monday, August 19th 2013

9:44 AM

Vincent van Gogh Drawings & paintings with Agostina Sagatory.



Agostina Sagatory

Vincent van Gogh foundations x-ray in this first picture.

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Wednesday, August 14th 2013

9:20 PM

Murder mystery or straightforward suicide?

Van Gogh: murder mystery or straightforward suicide?

Specialists from Amsterdam museum refute recent claims that 16-year-old schoolboy killed the artist

Van Gogh’s self-destructive tendencies are seen in Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear, 1889

Who killed Vincent van Gogh? The artist’s death in France was always assumed to be suicide, until the publication of the definitive biography by Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith two years ago. In it, the American writers unveiled a shocking theory: a 16-year-old schoolboy, René Secrétan, had shot Van Gogh, though whether intentionally or accidentally was unclear. The authors argued that the artist, who took two days to die, “welcomed death” and protected Secrétan by claiming that it was suicide.

Now the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam has joined the debate, with an article in the July issue of the Burlington Magazine. In a detailed review of the biography, two of its research specialists, Louis van Tilborgh and Teio Meedendorp, insist that Van Gogh’s death was suicide.

In the 960-page book, Van Gogh: the Life, Naifeh and Smith wrote: “For an act of such far-reaching significance and subsequent notoriety, surprisingly little is known about the incident that led to Van Gogh’s death at the age of 37.” All that is certain is that he died two days after sustaining a gunshot wound on 27 July 1890, somewhere in Auvers-sur-Oise.

They set out to investigate, relying heavily on a little-known interview given by Secrétan in 1957, shortly before his death. Secrétan recalled that he had owned a pistol, which he used for shooting squirrels. He and his elder brother, Gaston, knew Van Gogh and used to tease him.

René Secrétan claimed that the artist had stolen the gun from him but revealed nothing more about the shooting. Naifeh and Smith interpreted the interview as a deathbed confession and cited the late art historian John Rewald, who recalled a rumour in Auvers that “young boys shot Vincent accidentally”. According to the story, Van Gogh decided to protect René and Gaston from charges of murder or manslaughter.

Forensic evidence

Naifeh and Smith focused on the nature of the wound, concluding that the gun was fired “at some distance from the body, not close up”, with the bullet entering “from an unusual, oblique angle (not straight on)”. This evidence came from the doctors who treated Van Gogh: his friend Dr Paul Gachet and a local practitioner, Dr Jean Mazery.

Having examined the claims, Van Tilborgh and Meedendorp remain convinced that Van Gogh’s death was suicide. Their article argues that Secrétan’s interview does not substantiate the murder or manslaughter theory “in the slightest”. All it suggests is that Van Gogh may have somehow obtained the gun from the brothers. They also argue that, although Rewald repeated the rumour about the Secrétans, he “professed no particular belief in its accuracy”.

They cite new material published last year in a book by Alain Rohan (Vincent van Gogh: Aurait-on retrouvé l’arme du suicide?). Dr Gachet recollected that the wound was brown with a purple halo. The purplish ring would have been caused by the bullet’s impact, but the brownish one would have come from powder burns, indicating that the gun had been held close to the chest, under a shirt. This would almost certainly mean that Van Gogh was responsible.

Rohan also produced new evidence about the weapon. In the 1950s, a rusty revolver was discovered buried in a field just behind the Château d’Auvers, where Van Gogh is said to have shot himself. An examination suggested that it had been in the soil for 60 to 80 years. The gun was discovered close to the Chemin des Berthelées, the spot painted by Dr Gachet’s son in 1904, in a picture he entitled Auvers, the area where Vincent committed suicide. The revolver was found just beyond the low farmhouses in the centre of the painting.

The Burlington article also focuses on Van Gogh’s final weeks, arguing against the long-accepted theory that the artist was primarily concerned about losing financial support from his brother Theo. Van Tilborgh and Meedendorp say that Vincent was more concerned that Theo was “shutting him out” of decisions about his life. Theo was having serious problems with his employer, the Boussod Valadon gallery, and was considering setting up his own business. Theo decided to stay with the gallery but did not really consult his brother—making him feel even lonelier.

Van Tilborgh and Meedendorp conclude that suicide was “not an impetuous act, but a decision carefully arrived at”. Although Theo’s behaviour played a role, the key factor was “the painful idea that his obsession with his art had got him nowhere apart from toppling him into a chasm of mental turmoil”.

The two museum scholars looked for evidence of this turmoil in Vincent’s final weeks, pointing out that he had what was effectively a farewell note to Theo in his pocket at the time of the shooting. Although Wheatfield with Crows has traditionally been regarded as his last picture, it was probably made around 10 July, more than two weeks before his death, when he wrote of painting “immense stretches of wheatfields under turbulent skies, and I made a point of trying to express sadness, extreme loneliness”. Van Tilborgh has already suggested that the artist’s last two pictures, both unfinished, were Tree Roots and Farms near Auvers. The Burlington article suggests that the former was a programmatic adieu, expressing the struggle for survival of the elm trees.

Van Gogh said he had shot himself, as did those who were closest to him. Naifeh and Smith argued that the artist was lying; Van Tilborgh and Meedendorp accept it as the truth. Arguably, more attention should be focused on contemporary reports that it was suicide.

Dr Gachet immediately sent a note to Theo saying that Vincent had “wounded himself”. Adeline Ravoux, whose father ran the inn where the artist lodged, later recalled that Van Gogh had told a policeman that “it is I who wanted to kill myself”. Emile Bernard, an artist who attended the funeral, said that Van Gogh had stated just before dying that “his suicide had been absolutely deliberate”—a comment that probably came from Theo or Dr Gachet.

Horrific injury

Vincent was closer to Theo than anyone else. It is difficult to believe that he would have lied to his brother about the horrific injury simply to save two taunting teenagers from the attention of the police. After all, suicide was much more painful for Theo to bear, since he felt a degree of responsibility.

Most poignant are Vincent’s own final words: “This is how I wanted to go.” Theo added, in a letter to his wife, Jo: “It took a few moments & then it was over & he found the peace he hadn’t been able to find on earth.”


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Saturday, August 3rd 2013

11:59 AM

The Art of seeing,... Rembrandt & Vincent style




















 






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